Obituaries

Richard A. Kimball Jr., of Lincoln, Massachusetts and Leadbetter Island, Maine, formerly of New York, died on April 15 in Massachusetts. He was 85. The cause was Parkinson's disease, his family said.

Mr. Kimball was born in New York City in 1930, and grew up in Manhasset, Long Island. He was the son of Richard A. Kimball, an architect, and Josephine Dodge Kimball. After graduating from Brooks School and Yale University, he served in the U.S. Army for the 82nd Airborne before attending Yale Law School. He practiced law in New York as a partner of Hughes, Hubbard and Reed. An ardent Whiffenpoof, an a capella group at Yale, he was also passionate about Land Conservation, serving for years on the Board of the Dutchess Land Conservancy in Millbrook, NY, where he retired.

He is survived by his wife, Hopeton, three children, George Kimball, Sam Kimball and Sylvia Kimball Perry, and eight grand children. Burial will be private. Memorial donations may be made to the Dutchess Land Conservancy, P.O. Box 138, Millbrook, NY 12545.

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by Arvolyn Hill

William Thomson Wetmore, Jr., of Amenia, died with his family by his side on February 4 at Sharon Hospital, at the age of 84. He was a novelist and the founder of the Cascade Mountain Winery and Restaurant in Amenia.

Born in Boston in 1930 to Joan Deery and William Wetmore, Sr., Bill, as he was known to most, spent much of his childhood in New York City, where his grandfather, Charles Delevan Wetmore, of the architecture firm Warren and Wetmore, had worked with Whitney Warren to create buildings that are now landmarks. Grand Central Station, the New York Yacht Club and the Ritz-Carlton were three of their better-known creations. Although his mother was remarried to Palmer Dixon, on Broadway she was known as Joan Wetmore, a successful actress, and one of the many larger-than-life personalities that shaped him. Bill had many fond memories of times he spent as a young boy in and around the theater with his mother.

by Carola Lott

Bob Smith, one of the legendary horsemen of this era, died at the age of 87 on February19 at his home, Netherwood Acres. 

Bob’s career with horses began when he was ten, taking tourists from the city on trail rides into the Catskill Mountains. He studied agriculture and veterinary science at Cornell University for two years where he also played on the Polo Squad. 

Soon after he acquired Netherwood Acres in 1951, Bob became a member of the Rombout and Millbrook Hunts. He introduced countless people to foxhunting and provided horses for members of both the Millbrook and Rombout Hunts. They all share fond memories of how he influenced their lives. 

Millbrook Hunt joint master, Parker Gentry remembered, "Bob Smith had a keen understanding of animals as well as people. His wonderfully dry sense of humor combined with incredible patience served him well in the training of both."

802 Bob at the 2013 Millbrook Hunt opening meet when he was 85 - photo by Kathy Landman

by Carola Lott

Bob Smith, one of the legendary horsemen of this era, died at the age of 87 on February19 at his home, Netherwood Acres. 

Bob’s career with horses began when he was ten, taking tourists from the city on trail rides into the Catskill Mountains. He studied agriculture and veterinary science at Cornell University for two years where he also played on the Polo Squad. 

Soon after he acquired Netherwood Acres in 1951, Bob became a member of the Rombout and Millbrook Hunts. He introduced countless people to foxhunting and provided horses for members of both the Millbrook and Rombout Hunts. They all share fond memories of how he influenced their lives. 

Millbrook Hunt joint master, Parker Gentry remembered, "Bob Smith had a keen understanding of animals as well as people. His wonderfully dry sense of humor combined with incredible patience served him well in the training of both."

802 Bob at the 2013 Millbrook Hunt opening meet when he was 85 - photo by Kathy Landman

Frank Rechner, 82, of Bedford, New Hampshire, passed away on January 24, 2015, at Hillsborough County Nursing Home in Goffstown, New Hampshire. He was born in Bakony Oslop, Hungary, on February 18, 1932. In 1956 he moved to Millbrook, New York, where he managed Trotwood Farm and its herd of Black Angus, owned by Col. Roger Young. On Colonel Young’s death, he retired from farming but continued to live on Tower Hill Road. He married Erika L. Karpf in May 1961 at St. Joseph’s Roman Catholic Church. They divorced. She lives in Cairo, New York. He had a sister, who survives in Hungary. He is survived by two daughters, Erika E. Dyer, her husband Dave, and a son, Matthew, of Suffern, New York, and Tina S. Rechner, of Clinton Corners, New York. His parents, a brother and sister predeceased him. He resided with Hilde Romig for the past 29 years. He moved to New Hampshire in 2009. Services will be private. 

Posted: 2/18/2015


 

 

William Thomson Wetmore, Jr., of Amenia, NY died with his family by his side on February 4th at Sharon Hospital at the age of 84. He was a novelist and the founder of the Cascade Mountain Winery and Restaurant in Amenia.

Born in Boston in 1930 to Joan Deery and William Wetmore, Sr., Bill, as he was known to most, spent much of his childhood in New York City, where his grandfather, Charles Delevan Wetmore of the architecture firm Warren and Wetmore had worked with Whitney Warren to create buildings that are now landmarks, among them Grand Central Station, the New York Yacht Club and the Ritz Carleton.  Although his mother was remarried to Palmer Dixon, on Broadway she was known as Joan Wetmore, a successful actress, and one of the many larger-than-life personalities that shaped him. Bill had many fond memories of times he spent as a young boy in and around the theater with his mother.

After a long and courageous battle with cancer, Gérard Boyer died on Monday January 26. 

Gérard was born in June 1945 in the village of Varennes-Sur-Amance in the region of Champagne-Ardennes in France and was raised in the Paris suburbs at Chelles in Seine et Marne.

An account supervisor in Paris for McCann Erickson from 1969 -1978, Gérard developed materials for such clients as Coca-Cola and Goodyear. In 1978- 1986 he served as Director of Communications for Europe One where he was responsible for special events including the Paris Tennis Open and the European Soccer Cup. 

In 1986 he returned to McCann Erickson as General Manager for Public Relations where he conceived and organized a VIP Dinner for 500 people with Top Chefs of France. He was also in charge of the PR campaigns for Glenfiddich, William Lawson Scotch, Eristof Vodka, Nouilly Pratt, and Laroche Wines. He also produced a number of promotional sports events.