Volume 6, Issue 4

 Cary Institute of Ecosystem Studies: Scientific seminar: Biogeochemical Regime Shifts in Coastal Landscapes, with Ashley Helton, University of Connecticut. 11 a.m. Auditorium. 2801 Route 44 (Sharon Turnpike), Millbrook. (845) 677-5343. 
The Beacon: “Love Letters,” a play by A. R. Gurney, directed by Thomas deVilliars, associate producer at The Beacon. Through February 23. Fridays and Saturdays: 8 p.m.; Sundays: 3 p.m. $18; advance purchase recommended. www.thebeacontheatre.org.  

U.S. Congressman Chris Gibson told the Millbrook Independent that he has worked  to extend the Hurricane Sandy Relief Bill to access mitigation dollars for upstate communities damaged by flooding.  He is also working on a bill in the House that would continue Medicare Advantage and preferred insurance.

“Medicare Advantage gets high marks.  If you want to keep your insurance plan, you can.  I am also working on legislation that will allow people to access insurance across state lines,” he said.

When asked how much he thinks the Affordable Healthcare Act will cost the federal government he replied that the Congressional Budget Office (CBO) recently came out with a study showing that the country will lose 2.5 million jobs due to the implementation of the new healthcare law.  

“Costs are going up, deductibles are getting higher, premiums are going up, all this is having an adverse impact.  The goal was to drive down costs while expanding care, but we are doing just the opposite.  We have to convince the president of the adverse impacts of this law.”

New York-based patients trying to access services at Sharon Hospital may find that the hospital’s specialists—orthopedists, urologists, radiologists, cardiologists, etc.—are not covered by their NY Affordable Care Act (ACA) insurance.  Insurance companies covering Sharon Hospital—Empire, United Healthcare, Health Republic and Fidelis (not yet contracted)—are limiting patients who have signed up for the ACA to specialists who are “in network.”  That excludes Connecticut-based specialists, including those who are used for routine hospital care, such as radiologists who perform and read all the X-rays.  

They are stealing dog toys off lawns in Westchester, they are waiting until lights turn from red to green before crossing busy roads, they are trotting along behind joggers in Chicago and yes, they are here in the Hudson Valley. Humans have spent years trying to eliminate their forebears. Yet a larger, more resilient and more intelligent hybrid called the coy-wolf has established itself at the top of the foodchain. 

“The coywolf has taken over as top predator in all environments in New England, from wilderness parks to city greenbelts. Along its migration to the northeast it has become larger, the product of hybridization between western coyotes and eastern wolves, and with that, we see more speculation and theories about what the animal is, how it got here, and why it is here, ” explained Massachusetts wildlife biologist Jonathan Way, author of Suburban Howls.

A film that celebrates the beauty and fragility of songbirds in Europe takes on the daunting task of addressing what it takes to save them and change the centuries old cultural traditions of eating them.  Roger Kass and his brother Doug, produced and directed the film, “Emptying the Skies,” based on Jonathan’s Franzen’s New Yorker story.  The filmmakers embedded themselves in physically threatening situations where poachers were confronted by a small band of activists called the Committee against Bird Slaughter (CABS).  

Filmed in Cyprus, France, Italy and Germany, the film poignantly shows what it takes to save a single bird’s life and liberate it from nets, traps, and glue sticks and other medieval contraptions one bird at a time.  Viewers will learn that five billion birds migrate through Europe on their way to Africa and West Asia.  Over half of those bird species are threatened.

A film that celebrates the beauty and fragility of songbirds in Europe takes on the daunting task of addressing what it takes to save them and change the centuries old cultural traditions of eating them.  Millbrook resident Roger Kass and his brother Doug, produced and directed the film, “Emptying the Skies,” based  on Jonathan’s Franzen’s New Yorker story.  The filmmakers embedded themselves in physically threatening situations where poachers were confronted by a small band of activists called the Committee against Bird Slaughter (CABS).  

Filmed in Cyprus, France, Italy and Germany, the film poignantly shows what it takes to save a single bird’s life and liberate it from nets, traps, and glue sticks and other medieval contraptions one bird at a time.  Viewers will learn that five billion birds migrate through Europe on their way to Africa and West Asia.  Over half of those bird species are threatened.

It has long been believed that our "appetite" for lovemaking can be stimulated by certain foods. As Valentine's Day fast approaches I thought it would be interesting to explore the correlation between those foods in question and sex, separating the myths from the science, thus allowing you to best plan your menus for the big day.
Spotlights:   Fantasy Pizza at San Girogio's Trattoria The Chef gave me a new creation to try. It sounded crazy- it was pear and goat cheese pizza. We gave it a try and all three of us loved it (including my very discerning French relatives). If you are ordering pizzas to share and it is on the menu be sure to ask for it. (or maybe if they have the ingredients they might make it for you). It would probably make a good dessert but that would mean forgoing the chocolate flourless almond cake and I am just not willing to do that. Sour Cream Pound Cake at McEnroe's The other day I was at McEnroes, buying vegetables, when I spotted this Sour Cream Pound Cake, handcrafted bya Millerton baker- Mary Stevenson. I bought it and delighted my family with this light and moist plain cake that is not overly sweet. We each had a slice at breakfast and then toasted up some slices at lunch to top off with our favorite ice creams for an easy but lovely dessert.
Syndicate content