volume 6, Issue 25

The new exhibition at the RE Institute presents landscapes by two artists, Joshua Rosenblatt and Scott Culbreth, who offer very different views of the world around them. 

Rosenblatt created many of his charcoal drawings from the inside of his car while he waited to pick up his children from school near his home in Astoria, Queens. He says he makes “patterns out of my surroundings, taking them from nature or from human-made constructions. Once translated onto paper, they become a rhythmic assemblage of patterns, reflecting both physical space and the passage of time.” 

He constantly reworks his drawings. “In the panoramic drawings, time passes in the pictures as the eye wanders across them. The weather changes from rain to clear.”  Rosenblatt sometimes depicts the interiors of apartments. More often he shows the ‘landscapes’ of Queens “parking lots, parks and trees, and the effect of light and rain” often framed in the windscreen of his car to create “a window into the layers of urban life and nature as they meet and mix.”

 

October 1, 2014

Many people are familiar with Steve Tobin’s monumental “Steelroots” sculptures that could be seen last year at 12 sites around Kent, CT.

On September 13 the Morrison Gallery opened an exhibition of the artist’s most recent pieces. Tobin works in series each of which is so unlike the others that one would think they were all by different artists. 

Tobin graduated from Tulane in 1979 with a degree in theoretical mathematics which may be why he has always been interested in the point at which art and science converge. 

For his series, “Squeezes”, Tobin immersed melted wax in cold water before squeezing it into abstract shapes with one or sometimes both hands.  He then cast the piece in bronze before painting it in subtle hues - acid green perhaps, or the color of a fine Bordeaux. These abstract shapes sit on delicate pedestals. Some resemble the decorative elements on the handles of ancient Chinese bronzes.

October 1, 2014

They say opposites attract. Certainly Stephanie Anderson and Stephen Deitemann, whose work can now be seen at the Gallery on the Green in Pawling, give credence to that adage. The two artists who are married to each other both depict the streams and woods around their home in the Berkshires. However the resemblance that ends there illuminates how everyone’s view of the world is unique.

Anderson’s pencil drawings that explore the beauty of flowers, nuts, leaves and landscapes are distinguished with impeccable attention to minutiae. Each petal, each tendril, each hole in a leaf are rendered with meticulous precision. Her landscapes, although more dramatic, are no less detailed. Most remarkable are her skyscapes. The finely rendered fields and trees take up but a narrow band at the bottom of the paper. The rest is devoted to billowing clouds in a stormy sky.

September 30, 2014

A few years ago the term was little more than a head-spinning neologism. Now, thanks to worries about population growth, resource depletion, and especially global warming, it’s common coin — at least among scientists. “Sustainability” today stands alongside century-old areas of inquiry such as biochemistry and physics.

What it means was a significant part of Steven Cohen’s talk at the Cary Institute September 12. A compact bundle of restrained energy, Cohen is executive director of Columbia University’s The Earth Institute (note definite article) under its head, the visionary scientist Jeffrey Sachs. He’s been mixing environmental science and policy since his first job fresh out of Harvard at Nixon’s fledging Environmental Protection Agency.

One way to define  “sustainability” is the way Çohen spends much of his time: thinking about how society can extend the benefits the developed world has identified as beneficial and rewarding to the emerging world without wrecking the planet. 

 

Sheriff’s Office investigates one-car fatal crash                                      

Sherman Playhouse: Dividing the Estate by Horton Foote, directed by Katherine Almquist. Sept. 19-Oct. 12. Friday, Saturday, and Sundays. Call (860) 354-3622 for reservations. For more secure reservations online: http://shermanplayers.org/contact.php.
Sherman Playhouse: Dividing the Estate by Horton Foote, directed by Katherine Almquist. Sept. 19-Oct. 12. Friday, Saturday, and Sundays. Call (860) 354-3622 for reservations. For more secure reservations online: http://shermanplayers.org/contact.php.
Sherman Playhouse: Dividing the Estate by Horton Foote, directed by Katherine Almquist. Sept. 19-Oct. 12. Friday, Saturday, and Sundays. Call (860) 354-3622 for reservations. For more secure reservations online: http://shermanplayers.org/contact.php.
Pawling Free Library: Medicare orientation, a free seminar by Maggie Kwet of the Division of Aging Services: When to apply, what to expect, what you are required to do. Community Room–Annex. 6:30 p.m.–8:00 p.m. 11 Broad Street, Pawling. (845) 855-3444; www.pawlinglibrary.org.
Pawling Free Library: Job ready Session with Meghan Heady-Amara of Dutchess One-Stop. Free workshop on job-search skills from writing a resume to improving your interviewing. 10 p.m.–12 p.m. 11 Broad Street, Pawling. (845) 855-3444; www.pawlinglibrary.org.    
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